Aces Wild (1936)

Director: Harry L. Fraser
Writer: Harry L. Fraser (as Weston Edwards)
Producer: William Berke
Cinematographer: Robert E. Cline
Sound: Corson Jowett
Editor: Arthur A. Brooks
Assistant Director: William L. Nolte
Music:
Stunts: Jack Hendricks, Bill Patton, Francis Walker
 
Production Company: William Berke Productions Inc.











Cast

Harry Carey as Cheyenne Harry Morgan
Gertrude Messinger as Martha Worth
Theodore Lorch as Kelton (Credited as Ted Lorch)
Roger Williams as Slim - Henchman
Chuck Morrison as Hank - Henchman
Phil Dunham as Anson - Editor
Fred 'Snowflake' Toones - Snowflake (Credited as 'Snowflake')
Sonny the Marvel Horse as Sonny - Cheyenne's Horse (Credited as 'Sonny')

Ed Cassidy as Blacksmith (uncredited)
Jack Evans as Barfly (uncredited)
Jack Hendricks as Posse Rider (uncredited)
William McCall as Sheriff Ted (uncredited)
Bill Patton as Townsman (uncredited)
Francis Walker as Townsman (uncredited) 

Plot

Cheyenne rides into Durango and runs into his old enemy Kelton. Kelton brings his safe to the town that has no bank and lets the townspeople put their valuables in it. He intends to steal the loot and flee. When Durango exacts his plan, Cheyenne gets the Sheriff to join in the chase.

Review

Not seen yet.

Interesting Additional Information



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The Cheyenne Tornado (1935)

Director: William A. O'Connor
Writer: Oliver Drake
Producer: Willis Kent
Cinematographer: Harvey Gould
Sound: T.T. Triplett
Editor: S. Roy Luby
Production Manager: Bartlett A. Carre
Music: David Broekman (Stock Music)
Stunts: Dick Botiller, Art Dillard, Bert Dillard, Bill Hickey, Jack Jones, Eddie Juaregui, Tracy Layne, Lew Morphy, Bud Pope

Production Company: Willis Kent Productions
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Cast
 
Reb Russell - Red - Cheyenne Kid
Victoria Vinton - Jane Darnell
Roger Williams - Clem
Edmund Cobb - Pete Lang
Tina Menard - Rita Farley
Winton Perry - Jim Darnell (Credited as Winton Parry)
Dick Botiller - Filipe
Ed Porter - James Farley
Rebel - The Kid's Horse

Hank Bell - Sheriff (uncredited)
Smiley Burnette - Singer Over Credits (uncredited)
Bartlett A. Carre - Deputy (uncredited)
Art Dillard - Henchman (uncredited)
Bert Dillard - Henchman (uncredited)
Jack Evans - Henchman (uncredited)
Oscar Gahan - Barfly (uncredited)
Bill Hickey - Henchman (uncredited)
Jack Jones - Cabin Henchman (uncredited)
Jack King - Joe - Henchman (uncredited)
Tracy Layne - Slim - Henchman (uncredited)
Clyde McClary - Barfly (uncredited)
Lafe McKee - Seth Darnell (uncredited)
Lew Morphy - Posse Rider (uncredited)
Bud Pope - Henchman (uncredited)
Arthur Thalasso - Bartender (uncredited)


Plot

A cattle rancher is killed and the sheep men are blamed. The Cheyenne Kid arrives to help out and discovers the real truth behind the murder.

Review

Not seen yet.

Interesting Additional Information



Title Screens





Border Phantom (1937)

 
Director: S. Roy Luby
Writer: Fred Myton (Story and Screenplay)
Producer: A.W. Hackel
Cinematographer: Jack Greenhalgh
Sound: Clifford A. Ruberg
Editor: S. Roy Luby
Music: Unknown
Stunts: Tommy Coats, Matty Roubert

Production Company: Supreme Pictures 











Cast

Bob Steele - Larry O'Day
Harley Wood - Barbara Hartwell
Don Barclay - Lucky Smith
Karl Hackett - Obed Young
Horace Murphy - Sheriff Murphy
Miki Morita - Chang Lu
Perry Murdock - Jim Barton
Hans Joby - Dr. Von Kurtz
Frank Ball - Prof. Andrew Hartwell

Budd Buster - Man Springing Barb from Jail (uncredited)
Horace B. Carpenter - Old Barfly (uncredited)
Ed Cassidy - Big-City Newspaper-Editor (uncredited)
Barney Furey - Man in Barn (uncredited)
Oscar Gahan - Barfly (uncredited)
Jack Gardner - Newspaper-Reporter (uncredited)
Clyde McClary - Bartender Gus (uncredited)
Beal Wong - Smuggler-Servant (uncredited) 

Plot



Review

Not seen yet.


Interesting Additional Information



Title Screens



Jubal (1956)

Director: Delmer Daves
Writer: Russell S. Hughes and Delmer Daves (Screenplay), Paul I. Wellman (Novel)
Producer: William Fadiman
Cinematographer: Charles Lawton Jr. (Director of Photography)
Sound: John P. Livadary (Recording Supervisor), Harry Smith
Editor: Al Clark
Assistant Director: Eddie Saeta
Art Direction: Carl Anderson
Set Decoration: Louis Diage
Music: David Raksin
Costme Design: Jean Louis (Gowns)
Stunts: John Cason

Production Company: Columbia Pictures

 
 
 
 
 
 
Cast
 
Glenn Ford - Jubal Troop
Ernest Borgnine - Shep Horgan
Rod Steiger - 'Pinky' Pinkum
Valerie French - Mae Horgan
Felicia Farr - Naomi Hoktor
Basil Ruysdael - Shem Hoktor
Noah Beery Jr. - Sam - Horgan Rider
Charles Bronson - Reb Haislipp
John Dierkes - Carson - Horgan Rider
Jack Elam - McCoy - Bar 8 Rider
Robert Burton - Dr. Grant

John Cason - Ranch Owner (uncredited)
Michael Daves - One of the Tolliver Boys (uncredited)
Juney Ellis - Charity Hoktor (uncredited)
Don C. Harvey - Jim Tolliver (uncredited)
Robert 'Buzz' Henry - One of the Tolliver Boys (uncredited)
Larry Hudson - Bayne (uncredited)
Robert Knapp - Jake Slavin (uncredited)
Ann Kunde - Member of Hoktor's Wagon Train (uncredited)
William Rhinehart - Matt (uncredited)
Guy Wilkerson - Cookie (uncredited)  
 
Plot
 
 
 
Review
 
A superior version of the story about a drifter with a mysterious past turning up and being taken in by a rancher. There are good performances from the leading actors, but it is Ernest Borgnine who steals the show with a performance to match that of his Oscar-winning turn in Marty. His transformation from a happy man to a man with pure revenge in his eyes was incredible. Reminded me of the role played by Edward G. Robinson in Two Seconds (1932). There is the added bonus of the film being shot in glorious colour. Great film.













 
Interesting Additional Information
 
 
 
Title Screens
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

High Lonesome (1950)

Director: Alan Le May
Writer: Alan Le May
Producer: George Templeton
Cinematographer: W. Howard Greene
Sound: Harold Lewis, Walter Oberst
Editor: Jack Ogilvie
Assistant Director: James Paisley, Harry Templeton
Art Direction: John B. Goodman
Music: Rudy Schrager
Costme Design: Byron Munson (Wardrobe)
Stunts: Frank Cordell (Stunt Coordinator), Clem Fuller

Production Company: Le May-Templeton Pictures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cast
 
John Drew Barrymore - Cooncat (Credited as John Barrymore Jr.)
Chill Wills - Boatwhistle - Ranch Cook
John Archer - Pat Farrell
Lois Butler - Meagan Davis
Kristine Miller - Abby Davis
Basil Ruysdael - 'Horse' Davis - Ranch Owner
Jack Elam - Smiling Man
Dave Kashner - Roper
Frank Cordell - Frank
Clem Fuller - Dixie
Hugh Aiken - Art Simms
Howard Joslin - Jim Shell

Plot

A young drifter, who is new to the area, is the prime suspect when a sudden spurt of murders occurs in Texas Big Bend country. 

Review

John Drew Barrymore shows that the Barrymore talent has been passed down from his father in this dramatic performance. He was only 17 or 18 when filming began and showed a great sense of maturity in the role of the young drifter whilst also maintaining the drifter's struggles of making sense of the world. A very good film to watch for action and some suspense and at less than 90 minutes it doesn't drag at any point. Although there is love interest, which seemed to be in every film of this era, it doesn't get in the way too much of what we want to see; the tense action of a young man trying to convey his innocence to disbelieving cattle ranchers.














Additional Interesting Information

John Drew Barrymore is the father of Drew Barrymore and the son of screen legends John Barrymore and Dolores Costello. Barrymore's portrayal of a trouble young man rather reflects his own life with the Drug and alcohol abuse replacing the horse thievery.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chill Wills was not only an actor, but he was also a singer and a songwriter. He co-wrote and sang the song that was featured in this film, '20 Miles from Carson', with the director Alan Le May. He is also famous for having been in Laurel and Hardy's feature Western, 'Way Out West' in 1937 as one of The Avalon Boys and provided the voice for 'Francis the Talking Mule' in the film series starring Donald O'Connor.
 






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Destry Rides Again (1939)

Director: George Marshall
Writer: Felix Jackson (Original Story suggested by the novel 'Destry Rides Again' by Max Brand), Felix Jackson, Gertrude Purcell, Henry Myers (Screenplay)
Producer: Joe Pasternak
Associate Producer: Islin Auster
Cinematographer: Hal Mohr
Sound: Bernard B. Brown (Supervisor), Robert Pritchard
Editor: Milton Carruth
Assistant Director: Vernon Keays
Art Direction: Jack Otterson
Music: Frank Skinner (Score), Charles Previn (Musical Director)
Costme Design: Vera West
Stunts: Cliff Lyons, Frank McCarroll, Bud McClure, Tom Steele, Helen Thurston, Duke York (Stunt Coordinator)

Production Company: Universal Pictures
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cast
 
Marlene Dietrich - Frenchy
James Stewart - Thomas Jefferson 'Tom' Destry Jr.
Mischa Auer - Boris Callahan
Charles Winninger - Washington 'Wash' Dimsdale
Brian Donlevy - Kent
Allen Jenkins - Gyp Watson
Warren Hymer - Bugs Watson
Irene Hervey - Janice Tyndall
Una Merkel - Lily Belle Callahan
Billy Gilbert - Loupgerou
Samuel S. Hinds - Judge Hiram J. Slade
Jack Carson - Jack Tyndall
Tom Fadden - Lem Claggett
Virginia Brissac - Ma Sophie Claggett
Edmund MacDonald - Rockwell (Credited as Edmund Macdonald)
Lillian Yarbo - Clara
Joe King - Sheriff Joseph Keogh
Dickie Jones - Eli Whitney Claggett
Ann E. Todd - Claggett Girl (Credited as Ann Todd)

Richard Alexander - Cowboy (uncredited)
C.E. Anderson - Townsman (uncredited)
Silver Tip Baker - Barfly (uncredited)
John Barton - Townsman (uncredited)
Chief John Big Tree - Indian in Saloon (uncredited)
Billy Bletcher - Pianist (uncredited)
Rudy Bowman - Townsman (uncredited)
Ed Brady - Barfly (uncredited)
Loren Brown - Juggler (uncredited)
Ralph Bucko - Barfly (uncredited)
Roy Bucko - Barfly (uncredited)
Bob Card - Barfly (uncredited)
George Chesebro - Barfly (uncredited)
Noble 'Kid' Chissell - Townsman (uncredited)
Dora Clement - Woman (uncredited)
Bill Cody Jr. - Townsboy Telling Wash of Destry's Arrival (uncredited)
Spade Cooley - Fiddle Player (uncredited)
Harry Cording - Creepy - Lends Tom Guns (uncredited)
Carmen D'Antonio - Dancer (uncredited)
Harold DeGarro - Juggler (uncredited)
Tex Driscoll - Barfly (uncredited)
Florence Dudley - Small Role (uncredited)
Ruth Eddings - Friend of Lilly Belle (uncredited)
O.K. Ford - Barfly (uncredited)
Sam Garrett - Rider / Roper (uncredited)
Slim Gaut - Townsman (uncredited)
William Gillis - Barfly (uncredited)
Jack Gordon - Barfly (uncredited)
Lloyd Ingraham - Express Agent with Box of Rabbits (uncredited)
Marjorie Kane - Saloon Floozie (uncredited)
Paul King - Waiter (uncredited)
Harley Luse - Accordion Player (uncredited)
Johnny Luther - Barfly (uncredited)
Cactus Mack - Musician (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard - Cowhand (uncredited)
Frank McCarroll - Barfly (uncredited)
Bud McClure - Stage Driver (uncredited)
Merrill McCormick - Townsman (uncredited)
Philo McCullough - Bartender (uncredited)
Robert McKenzie - Doctor (uncredited)
Robert Milasch - Townsman (uncredited)
Charles Murphy - Townsman (uncredited)
Tex Parker - Townsman (uncredited)
Carl Sepulveda - Greets Stage (uncredited)
Mary Shannon - Woman on Street (uncredited)
Rudy Sooter - Bass Player (uncredited)
Betta St. John - Singing Girl in Wagon (uncredited)
William Steele - Cowboy (uncredited)
Leo Sulky - Bartender (uncredited)
Al Taylor - Townsman (uncredited)
Harry Tenbrook - Stage Shotgun Rider (uncredited)
Jack Tornek - Barfly (uncredited)
Minerva Urecal - Mrs. DeWitt (uncredited)
Leslie Vincent - (uncredited) (unconfirmed)
Hank West - Musician (uncredited)
Dan White - Barfly (uncredited)
Blackie Whiteford - Juror (uncredited)
Alex Woloshin - Assistant Bartender (uncredited)
Duke York - Townsman (uncredited) 
 
Plot
 
Deputy sheriff Tom Destry Jr., son of the formidable lawman Tom Destry, tames the town of Bottleneck using civility and intellect, and refuses to carry a gun.  
 
Review
 
A superior piece of writing, directing and acting from all concerned, this is a joy to watch from start to finish. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interesting Additional Information
 
Loved seeing singer/dancer Marjorie Kane as the saloon floozy in a featured comic moment. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Mystery Ranch (1934)

Director: Bernard B. Ray
Writer: J.K. Henry (Story), Carl Krusada (Dialogue)
Continuity: Rose Gordon
Producer: Bernard B. Ray
Associate Producer: Harry S. Webb
Cinematographer: J. Henry Kruse
Sound: J.S. Westmoreland
Editor: Fred Bain
Assistant Director: B. Raymond
Music: Unknown
Stunts: Jim Corey, Jack Hendricks, Frank McCarroll

Production Company: Reliable Pictures Corporation









Cast

Tom Tyler - Robert Morris
Roberta Gale - Mary Henderson
Louise Cabo - Mrs. Henderson
Jack Perrin - George Andrews (Credited as Jack Gable)
Frank Hall Crane - Percy Jenkins (Credited as Frank Cane)
Charles King - Sam
Tom London - Blake
George Chesebro - Kern
Lafe McKee - Sheriff

Jimmy Aubrey - Pig Sty Pete / Jim Crocker (uncredited)
Jim Corey - Cowhand (uncredited)
John Elliott - Dad Morris (uncredited)
Lew Meehan - Bill (uncredited)
Robert Walker - Deputy (uncredited)

Plot

A writer of Western novels is invited to a ranch to sample the cowboy life for real, including set-ups of a lynching, a runaway, a chase after horse thieves and a fake feud. The writer isn't fooled by any of it until real robbers turn up.

Review

Watched this one a while ago and it was just poor. A very bad excuse for a movie. As usual Charles King is the best actor in it, but he is stifled by a bad plot, a bad script. and bad direction. And the good actor that is John Elliott could have been used to better effect. The highlight for me was seeing how bad Louise Cabo was. She was a former silent actress and she seemed to have been plucked off the street and asked to fill in because she didn't seem to know what to do. Was there any direction at all? I don't normally give films such a poor rating but what can I do.














Interesting Additional Information

Jimmy Aubrey was a legendary comic performer and originally worked in theatres with Fred Karno before becoming an understudy to Charlie Chaplin. He starred in his own silent comedy shorts starting in 1915. Aubrey worked with Oliver Hardy in a series of shorts starting in 1919 and later appeared in the Laurel and Hardy film That's My Wife in 1929. He retired from films in the mid 1950s, having appeared in over 470. This may not have been his finest moment, but it is always good to see him in anything.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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